haibutsu no ie

winter's computers
found, loved, and nurtured for spring
my ugly geek secret

Sunday, January 20, 2008

twoears

Model

  • Toshiba Satellite Pro 460CDT
Introduced
  • 1996
CPU
  • Intel Pentium MMX, 166MHz
RAM
  • 32 MB
Video
  • C&T F65554
  • 12.1" 800 x 600 TFT LCD display
Disk
  • 2 GB harddrive
  • CD-ROM
Network
  • 100BASE-TX (Xircom RE-100 Cardbus NIC)
Operating Systems
  • Windows 2000 Professional
Features
  • Accupoint mouse
  • IrDA infrared port
  • 33.6 /14.4 Kbps Data/Fax/Voice modem
  • Lexmark 3200 Color inkjet printer
  • HP Scanjet 5400C scanner
When iorek became the kids' computer I couldn't get the printer and scanner to work as Lexmark didn't offer Macintosh drivers and HP insisted on charging for them (only available on CD). So, I set up twoears to be a print server and scanning station via remote control using VNC. The printer and documents folder are shared so my other computers can print to and scan from it.

Even after optimizing Windows to work in 32MB of memory, though, it still doesn't work very well. I'm going to have to dig up some more RAM for it or find drivers and install Windows 98 instead.

ridley

Model

  • HP Vectra VL800 MT
Introduced
  • 2001
CPU
  • Intel Pentium 4, 1700MHz
RAM
  • 1280 MB
Video
  • ATI Radeon 9800 PRO
Disk
  • 250 GB harddrive
  • DVD-ROM
  • DVD-RAM
Network
  • 100BASE-TX
Operating Systems
  • Windows 2000 Professional
Features
  • 32" Westinghouse LCD Digital Widescreen TV
  • Lexmark 3200 Color inkjet printer
  • HP Scanjet 5400C scanner
  • Logitech QuickCam Pro webcam (mostly used for Skype)
  • Logitech WingMan Precision gamepad
  • Belkin Nostromo n40 gamepad
  • Logitech Attack 3 joystick
  • Nexxtech Mini Racing Wheel
Originally ridley was the kids' computer, but when we got the digital TV I hooked it up and transfered the kids' documents, email, bookmarks, etc. to iorek. This computer has a fast graphics card and a bunch of game controllers (including a racing wheel with separate gas and brake pedals) for playing games, a webcam for Skype, and runs GB-PVR for watching movies and listening to music.

iorek

Model

  • Apple eMac (ATI Graphics)
Introduced
  • 2003
CPU
  • PowerPC 7445 (G4), 1.0 GHz
RAM
  • 768 MB
Video
  • ATI Radeon 7500 (AGP 4x)
Disk
  • 80 GB harddrive
  • 4x SuperDrive
Network
  • Wireless (AirPort Extreme)
  • 10/100BASE-T
Operating Systems
  • Mac OS X 10.3.9 (Panther)
Features
  • 17-inch flat CRT
  • Two Firewire 400 ports
  • 18-watt stereo speakers
  • Microphone
  • Modem
I did some work for a friend and as partial payment I took iorek home. As a coincidence, I had spent the previous weekend tweaking Ubuntu on stinky to look like OS X, but it just didn't work smoothly. A week later I had the real thing.

I bought a refurbished AirPort Extreme card from Apple as well. Donnie tried to install it but it was difficult to tell when it was fully inserted. After I tried a few times, it finally worked (thankfully without damaging anything in the process).

I've never had so much fun setting up a computer; this Mac is an absolute pleasure to use. The kids can control it by talking to it ("Computer, open World of Warcraft"). It even tells (really bad) knock-knock jokes if you ask it to. It comes with iTunes which works with the Rio S10 MP3 player I handed down to Donnie Darko last summer, and it comes with iPhoto which lets him play with the photos on his hand-me-down Fuji FinePix A101. iPhoto also works with the Vtech KidiZoom camera Calvin got for Christmas. It also comes with iMovie that the kids can use to create and mix movies from their animations, the webcam, and our camcorder (though because it's an old analog camcorder they'll have to transfer video through the MythTV system). When they're all done, they can turn their movie into a standard DVD (with menus and everything) using iDVD. It's just amazing what you can do with a Mac straight out of the box.

Tuesday, December 18, 2007

escalus

Model

  • Compaq Deskpro 2000 5200MMX
Introduced
  • 1997
CPU
  • Intel Pentium MMX, 200MHz
RAM
  • 256 MB
Video
  • S3 Trio64V2/GX
Disk
  • 4 GB harddrive
  • CD-ROM
Network
  • 100BASE-TX
  • 100BASE-TX
  • 100BASE-TX
  • 10BASE2
Operating Systems
  • OpenBSD 4.1
Features
  • Serial and parallel ports
I built my own Internet firewall using OpenBSD, famous for its security. escalus now manages my firewall, routing, DHCP, and DNS for my home network. I wanted the experience of building these services myself and to see what OpenBSD was like, but I also wanted the additional flexibility of being able to run utilities on my firewall for testing my Internet connection which can be slow at times. Besides routing between the Internet, the wired lab network, and the wireless network, escalus also has an old 10BASE2 NIC for networking my DOS machines.

Monday, November 26, 2007

raising the dead

I've had a broken Mac Plus gathering dust in my collection for years. It's an all-in-one design with a high-voltage analog board (technical term: monitor guts) that controls the display and a one-piece motherboard (the computer itself). These Macs were fanless: wonderfully silent and cooled by convection, the case acting like a chimney. At least that was the plan. Excess heat and a couple of poor component choices on the analog board resulted in notorious problems like the analog board warping causing solder joints to crack.

This was the typical result.

I took my Plus apart recently to try to resolder some of the connections in the hope that they were just cracked. That didn't fix the problem, though, so I found a list of common problem components in the pickle's Low-End Mac FAQ and ordered some replacements from Digi-Key.

I enlisted Donnie to help me out and to give him a bit of experience with soldering and electronics in general. The tube circuit can store something like 30 thousand volts even after the power is turned off, so the first step was to discharge it. Donnie wasn't too happy with the idea of doing this, but I had him stand on a step stool and with one hand insert a screwdriver into the grounding lug while I wedged another screwdriver under the anode cap and touched the two together. Had it been fully charged we would have heard a loud snap and seen a big spark between the screwdrivers, but — much to Donnie's relief — the charge had dissipated since I had last powered it up and we didn't notice anything. I was a bit disappointed.

A paper shield covers the solder joints on the mask side of the analog board.

I found that PC expansion slot covers work really well for popping the four buttons that held the shield in place.

Looking more closely, there was a clear bulge in capacitor C1 (top right), the likely culprit. Donnie heated up the capacitor's solder joints and I pulled it out.

The replacement part didn't look anything like the original which made me wonder if this was the correct part. It's just the package type, though, and the capacitance and voltage rating looked correct so we went ahead.

I bent the leads and popped the replacement capacitor in. With a little instruction, Donnie did an awesome job of resoldering the connections. That soldering iron is older than he is; I got it from my folks when I was not much older than Donnie is now.

The replacement cap looked a bit odd but the fit was okay. After trimming the leads, we put the Plus back together and powered it up. The screen was disappointingly black for a moment, but then...

It worked! Wow. I was rather surprised how well that went. We didn't even have to adjust the video circuits.

It won't boot, though. The floppy drive is dirty and possibly broken. I may have to replace it. I also have to dig up a keyboard and mouse (I think I've got both but the mouse has no ball... insert your own joke here) and connect the external SCSI harddrive and see if the SCSI CD-ROM I've got works. I may have to do a bit of shopping on eBay to get this Plus fully functional... or I may try something a bit more radical...

Saturday, November 3, 2007

getneckid

Model

  • NEC Versa VX
Introduced
  • 2000
CPU
  • Intel Pentium III (Coppermine), 450MHz
RAM
  • 192 MB
Video
  • ATI Rage Mobility-M
  • 14.1" XGA (1024 x 768) TFT LCD display
Disk
  • 18 GB harddrive
  • CD-ROM
Network
  • Wireless (CardBus NIC)
Operating Systems
  • Microsoft Windows 2000
Features
  • TouchPad
  • TV Out
  • Infrared
Formerly called balthasar and running Ubuntu Linux, getneckid was too slow and awkward to use as we had to sync my wife's phone via a second laptop running Windows, sync that laptop to ScheduleWorld, and finally sync ScheduleWorld to stinky. Also, for some reason, her web browser kept freezing up on her (I tried both Firefox and Opera). It looked like a memory problem but I wasn't able to resolve it or even prove definitively that this was the issue. I'm going to test it with the latest Ubuntu, but I never had the problems we when we used that laptop before. It seems to be some particular way she uses it, like maybe having both Evolution and Firefox or Opera open at the same time.

getneckid is still slow, of course, but documents load particularly slowly due to the virus scanner (Avast), a component not required for Linux. Opera was working well for her as a web browser, so I installed the Windows version. Overall it seems to be working well so far.

stinky

Model

  • IBM Thinkpad T20
Introduced
  • 2000
CPU
  • Intel Pentium III (Coppermine), 650MHz
RAM
  • 256 MB
Video
  • S3 86C270-294 Savage/IX-MV
  • 14.1" XGA (1024x768) TFT LCD display
Disk
  • 18 GB harddrive
  • DVD-ROM
Network
  • Wireless (CardBus NIC)
Operating Systems
  • Ubuntu Linux 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake)
Features
  • ThinkLight, which allows you to see your keyboard in the dark (activated by pressing the leftmost bottom key and topmost right key)
  • TrackPoint (nipple mouse)
Formerly known as benvolio, I rebuilt stinky and moved the wife's account over (email, bookmarks, etc.) from balthasar. The kids have used this laptop to watch DVDs when we wanted to watch a less kid-friendly DVD on the TV. I've since moved the wife back to her former laptop getneckid — running Windows 2000 — as this simplifies syncing her phone.

she had weird issues on stinky as well: it froze often after opening links from Evolution. The web browser seemed to be the culprit, but I tried both Firefox and Opera and the same thing happened. I'm going to install the latest Ubuntu to test it further, and also to investigate the hibernate function which I couldn't get to work, even after I set it up on a FreeDOS partition (hibernation uses a file rather than a partition for saving the hibernation data) and confirmed that it will hibernate from FreeDOS.

Saturday, July 14, 2007

installing xubuntu linux on libretto

Got a comment from Sully2 about libretto, wanting to know details of how I set up Xubuntu without a CD-ROM drive.

Funny you should ask, Sully, as just this week I started looking into a different version of Linux to load onto libretto. All my apps work well, but it takes ages for them to load (even with prelinking) and to switch between them. Feisty might be better than Dapper for this, but you might want to consider something like DSL (Damn Small Linux). That's what I'm looking at now.

Last week I even compiled my own kernel for it, but I couldn't find much to tweak and I didn't notice any speed improvement. One thing I noticed though is that it looks like everything that's not compiled into the stock Xubuntu kernel is set up as a module, which would explain why (X)Ubuntu has such great hardware compatibility. I think this also means that you can take a shortcut to install Feisty on your Libretto, if you still think you want to.

If you know nothing about Linux then I really recommend that you not attempt this, Sully, especially if you want to keep Windows. Ubuntu and it's derivatives are dead simple to install on most PCs and laptops, but the Libretto is a special case even if you have the CD-ROM drive and PCMCIA adapter. If I had detailed, step-by-step instructions for you then it wouldn't be too risky, but I didn't take notes so much of this will be vague.

You need a second laptop that works with the Libretto hard drive, or a PC with a laptop hard drive adapter. To avoid problems like modifying the wrong hard drive, the Libretto hard drive should be the only one in this other laptop/PC and you'll do all the work from the Ubuntu LiveCD.

Before removing the hard drive from the Libretto, defrag the Windows partition. Then, from the other laptop/PC , resize it with parted (see http://www.gnu.org/software/parted/manual/parted.html) or Ghost or Partition Magic or something to make room for Linux. This is assuming the hard drive is big enough to hold both OSes.

Leave room on the hard drive for the hibernation data. I marked the empty space (which DOS can't see but Linux can — don't know about Windows) as a special partition, but unless you want to use an extended partition you can just write down the details of where the hibernation space starts (if the drive is larger than — I think — 8GB, the hibernation space won't be at the end; it should be the size of your RAM plus video memory plus some overhead, but 100MB should cover it).

As mentioned above, there might be a simple way to install Xubuntu from this point: now that there's space on the hard drive, you could try just installing Xubuntu on the other laptop/PC. This would be straight forward, and when you're done you should be able to just move the hard drive back into the Libretto. Like I mentioned, it looks like everything's either included in the kernel or installed as modules, so it should work no matter what laptop or PC you put the hard drive in.

But I haven't tried that so I can't say for sure that it will work. So continuing with how I did it:

Copy an image of the Ubuntu install CD onto a 700MB temporary partition on the hard drive (right before the hibernation space); that is, there will be no filesystem on the partition and you'll have to use the dd command to copy the raw bytes from the CD directly to the partition (see https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/FromHardDriveWithFloppies).

Setup another partition to run the install from. I seem to recall I was able to install Xubuntu onto this partition as well, so make it big (but try to leave room for a swap partition; I would put the swap partition right after the Windows partition, followed by the Xubuntu partition, followed by the hibernation space).

Copy vmlinuz and initrd.gz from the install folder on the CD to the root of the install partition.

Install Grub onto the hard drive's MBR; you can check https://help.ubuntu.com/community/GrubHowto/BootFloppy (step 4 in particular, substituting your hard drive for the floppy) but you probably just need the setup command.

Move the hard drive back into the Libretto and boot it.

At the Grub prompt, enter this (from https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/FromHardDriveWithFloppies):

root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz append vga=normal initrd=/initrd.gz ramdisk_size=16384 root=/dev/rd/0 rw --
initrd /initrd.gz
boot

(that should be four lines, one each starting root, kernel, initrd, and boot)

... substituting your install partition for hd0,0 (where hd0 is the first hard drive and hd0,0 is the first partition on the first hard drive).

When asked to install modules from a disk, say no and specify the temporary partition you copied the CD to.

If everything goes well, Xubuntu will now install. If it has trouble booting (because you already installed Grub, above) you can use the LiveCD to do a repair and fix Grub.

When it works to your satisfaction, put the hard drive back in the other laptop/PC, boot from the Ubuntu LiveCD again, and use parted to remove the temporary 700MB partition and resize the install partition over it (be careful not to resize it into the hibernation space).

If something goes horribly wrong you may have to reinstall Windows, but I seem to recall that Win95 and/or Win98 required that you insert the CD during the install, which of course is impossible if you don't have the CD-ROM drive or PCMCIA adapter card. Something to keep in mind.

Saturday, June 16, 2007

the big sleep

biglug wouldn't boot. The four AA's were long dead, leaking acid into the cheap, black plastic battery holder, my homegrown replacement for the original CMOS battery. It had lost all knowledge of what it was: what floppies, what hard drives, what monitors were attached to it. It didn't even know what time it was, convinced it was January 1st, 1980, flashback to big hair and FM synthesized music. New batteries would have to wait; I wanted to know what was on that hard drive.

Hours of wandering FTP sites in the lonely, dark corners of the world-wide-cobweb had turned up gold in the form of an ancient Compaq setup and diagnostics diskette image. Having dumped it to a dusty 720K disk — its label torn, words scratched out and over-written in an indecipherable history of recycled media — I brought biglug up and filled it in on what it was, what it could do (or more to the point, what it couldn't do), that the end of the millenium had come and gone and it was now an antique, sought more for nostalgia than number crunching. With the CMOS freshly updated, I ejected the diskette and rebooted. No dice.

Hard drive stiction. My old nemesis. "Never though I'd see you again," I croaked, the bitter memories rising like smoke from a sixty watt soldering iron. There was a time when a hard drive's read/write heads — gliding on Bernoulli's cushions of air — would land on the platters when power was cut, right on top of whatever data was being read at the time. Sometimes the heads would stick to the platters and the platters would refuse to spin up.

The first few times the client could finesse his way out of it, cycle the power repeatedly and maybe... just maybe... his drives would spin up and he could buy a little time to make backups, something he should have been doing as regularly as changing his underwear. Eventually the drive would stop cooperating and I'd be called in. I'd show up — often just after the client had changed his underwear — pull the drive out, hold it in one hand, and give it a quick twist. Typically that's all the convincing it would need.

I started down the path I'd taken so many times before, removing the covers, opening the card cage, releasing the drive cages. It was an old routine and biglug yielded willingly, though it shed pieces of its covers every time regardless of how much care I took.

I released the hard drive cage from the bottom as well, replacing the batteries while I was at it.

To protect the drive from stiction, it was common practice to "park" the heads in the "landing zone," an area of the hard drive with no data. This was before "voice coils," where the heads were attached to springs that would pull them back into the landing zone whenever the power was cut. Designed by dames, I reckon. A real man would manually run a utility that parked the heads before shutting down, taking his chances with power failures. After all, you always had your backup.

Even in the landing zone drives could experience stiction, though, as happened to biglug. I know I manually parked its heads before shutting it down last time.

Once I wrote a utility that parked a drive's heads on the other side of the disk from the landing zone in order to avoid stiction. I just partitioned the drive to skip the first and last cylinders so nothing important would be saved there, effectively creating my own landing zones. I wrote the utility in machine language using the DOS debug command, saving it to a .COM file. Then I bit the top off a bottle of whiskey, downed the entire contents in one go, and dug a bullet out of the back of my neck with a rusty steak knife dripping with iodine. Or something like that... I'm a little hazy on what happened after I wrote the .COM file.

A little twist, and with the boards plugged back in, the hard drive was spinning again.

There was something wrong, though. I needed to configure the CMOS again since I had swapped out the batteries, but the setup and diagnostic diskette wasn't booting. I checked my connections; everything looked good. The floppy was trying to boot but would just make a bunch of noise and fail. I immediately swapped out the floppy drive, worried but hopeful. It would be OK. biglug would pull through. We'd been through much worse than this.

The new drive was making the same noises. Controller problem then. Or motherboard... no, don't think like that. Get a hold of yourself.

I checked the connections again. The proprietary floppy controller wasn't fully seated. I cursed myself for not taking the appropriate care, for not checking twice before powering up. I reseated the controller but it was too late: biglug started with the same pathetic sounds.

This was it then.

I slowly reached over and placed my hand on the power switch, hesitated, then forced myself to toggle the switch and shut biglug off. One last look at the CRT, the words "601 - floppy error" fading slowly with the persistence of the old green phosphors, and I locked the keyboard back in place one last time over the dark screen.

It was the big sleep for biglug.

Tuesday, June 12, 2007

grimlock

Model

  • DEC PDP-11/44
Introduced
  • 1979
CPU
  • DEC PDP-11/44
RAM
  • 256 KB, 512 KB, 768 KB, or 1MB (don't remember which)
Video
  • Data General 6500A serial console (VT52 compatible terminal)
Disk
  • DEC RL01 5.2 MB disk cartridge subsystem
  • Plessey PM-DDA11/B 5 MB dual fixed / removable cartridge subsystem
Network
  • none installed
Operating Systems
  • RT-11
  • RSTS/E
  • Unix
Features
  • CDA MSP-3000 Array Processor
I used one of these in college for a low-level programming course. Its assembly language is a thing of beauty. The CPU is several boards inside the second unit from the top.

The terminal was a later addition. Previously I just used a terminal emulator on one of my DOS PCs, which turned out handy when — while inspecting the CPU — I snapped a pin off the boot rom. Fortunately I got the short boot code from somewhere (one of the thousand manuals that came with it, I think) and wrote a little BASIC program on the DOS PC that would feed the boot code to grimlock's console then boot it. It worked like a charm.

I had grimlock almost booting off a cartridge in the RL01 (top unit), but after throwing a few characters on the console saying it was booting Unix it just hanged. I don't know if the problem is the RL01 or the cartridge, but I have almost a dozen others that I haven't tried yet.

Some of them are for the Plessey drive (third unit from the top), which is a weird beast that has a removable cartridge portion and a non-removable cartridge sealed inside it. The entire unit pretends to be two RK05Js.

I haven't tried to get it to work yet, nor the array processor (bottom unit), which is like the numerical coprocessor chip on pre-Pentium PCs. One interesting feature of the array processor is that in 1979 it implemented instruction pipelining, a feature that Intel added to the '486 ten years later.

I've got a box full of expansion cards, too. One might be a network card, but right now this thing has no network capability.

I haven't turned grimlock on since I lived in Port Moody 15 years ago. The CPU by itself sounds like a jet plane taking off. In Keremeos I was always afraid the street lights would dim if I started it up.

Sunday, June 10, 2007

a2brute

Model

  • Apple IIe Platinum
Introduced
  • 1987
CPU
  • WDC 65C02, 1MHz
RAM
  • 128 KB
Video
  • 560 x 192, 16 colour
Disk
  • 5¼" floppy
Network
  • none
Operating Systems
  • ProDOS 1.1
  • Apple DOS 3.3
  • CP/M
Features
  • CP/M card
I was fascinated by computers at a young age, being a sci-fi fanatic, but I never thought I'd ever see one in the little town of Revelstoke. Then one afternoon in Grade 9 (1982), after classes, I walked past a small room that I'd never seen inside before. The door was open and through it I saw some students working on about a half dozen Apple II+ computers. Grade 9's were not allowed to use the computers except as part of a class, and we did get a brief introduction to them as part of Math class. I was hooked then.

When I got into Grade 10 there were no computer classes available, but I was allowed to use any computer that hadn't been reserved by the Grade 11's and 12's. So I learned to program in BASIC a few minutes at a time, and by Grade 11 I was passing on all my bad programming habits to other Computer Science students. In Grade 12 I was teaching myself 6502 assembly language while being forced through a paradigm shift to structured Pascal programming in class.

So, while I never became a professional programmer (that's another story) my current career did start with this particular computer (or, actually, its immediate predecessor).

trash80

Model

  • Tandy TRS-80 Color Computer 2
Introduced
  • 1983
CPU
  • Motorola 6809E, 0.89 MHz
RAM
  • 64 KB
Video
  • 256 x 192, 2 colour
Disk
  • none
Network
  • none
Operating Systems
  • none
Features
  • Digital-to-analog converter
The big religious war when I was in highschool was Apple II versus TRS-80. I would always give my friend Aaron a hard time about his TRS-80 CoCo (Colour Computer). The heart of this supposedly intellectual debate was that the Apple II used a 6502 processor, a knock off of the superior (in my opinion) Motorola 6809. The Trash-80s, in contrast, had to suffer with the ugly (in my opinion) Z-80 processor.

Only years later did I find out that while some TRS-80s used the Z-80 processor, the CoCos actually used a 6809. If I had only known this, all those years ago... I would have found some other pointless rationalization for why the Apple II was still superior.

One thing I secretly admired about Aaron's CoCo, though, was the speech synthesizer program. When he told it to say a particular number — "forty-six" or something — it would sound like it was saying "bloody pig." That was cool.

mabell

Model

  • AT&T PC 6300
Introduced
  • 1984
CPU
  • Intel 8086, 8 MHz
RAM
  • 640 KB
Video
  • 12" Monochrome
  • 640 x 200 CGA, 640 x 400 extended
Disk
  • 20 MB harddrive
  • 360 KB 5¼" floppy
Network
  • Interlink via parallel port
Operating Systems
  • MS-DOS 6.22
Features
  • Monitor uses 640x400
mabell is set up identically to bozo. It runs PCTools Desktop, in which I had created databases for phone messages, to do lists, tracking what shows we'd recorded on video tape, and various other mundane purposes.

It also has a couple of baby-bash programs I had written many years ago for Donnie Darko. I've got video of him bashing away at them. One program just made different shaded boxes with a corresponding tone every time a key was pressed. It was noisy and annoying and he loved it.

The other was more for showing to visitors. Every time a key was pressed the program would display the next character in a text file. The result was when Donnie bashed the keyboard perfect English would appear on the screen as if he had just typed it in.

Saturday, June 9, 2007

bozo

Model

  • Compaq Deskpro
Introduced
  • 1984
CPU
  • Intel 8086, 7.14 MHz
RAM
  • 640 KB
Video
  • 12" Monochrome
  • 640 x 200 CGA, 80 x 25 (text) MDA
Disk
  • 10 MB harddrive
  • 360 KB 5¼" floppy (A:)
  • 360 KB 5¼" floppy (B:)
Network
  • Interlink via parallel port
Operating Systems
  • MS-DOS 6.22
Features
  • Monitor switches between MDA and CGA mode, so you get nice crisp text when not displaying graphics
  • TVOut option
  • Boots in slower compatibility mode, but pressing Ctrl-Alt-\ switches to 7.14 MHz
bozo is set up identically to mabell. It's got PC-Tools Deluxe on it, which includes a bunch of file system utilities and Desktop: a suite including Notepad (text editor), Outline (structured text editor), Database, a remote dial-up terminal, calculators, and a few other functions.

At one time I had this linked to another PC through the DOS Interlink utility, which allows a PC acting as a client to access the drives of another PC acting as a server. In fact, I had three PCs connected together this way, so that one PC would publish its drives over a null-modem serial port cable to the second PC, and the second PC would publish its drives and the Interlink connected drives of the first PC via a Laplink parallel port cable to the third PC.

Clever or sad... you decide.

biglug

Model

  • Compaq Portable 286
Introduced
  • 1985
CPU
  • Intel 80286, 6/8 MHz
RAM
  • 640 KB
Video
  • 7" Monochrome
  • 640 x 200 CGA, 80 x 25 (text) MDA
Disk
  • 20 MB harddrive
  • 720 KB 3½" floppy
  • 1.2 MB 5¼" floppy
Network
  • Interlink via parallel port
Operating Systems
  • MS-DOS 6.22
Features
  • Internal monitor switches between MDA and CGA mode, so you get nice crisp text when not displaying graphics
  • TVOut option
  • External CGA monitor option
  • Can switch between 6 MHz compatible mode and 8 Mhz turbo mode
Portable in the 80s meant anything with a handle on it. Put a handle on your house: mobile home. The Compaq Portable 286 was the first "portable" PC with the 80286 processor. It weighs about 20 kgs, has a handle on the top/back, and when not in use the entire thing rests on the keyboard attached to the bottom/front. 20 kgs resting on the keyboard; they don't build them like that anymore.

biglug is running MS-DOS 6.22, I suspect. I can't tell because due to stiction the hardrive won't spin up. The CMOS battery is dead, too. Actually the CMOS battery died years ago and I replaced it with a battery holder with four AA batteries in it. Those batteries are dead too, and I don't fancy taking biglug apart again as every time I do pieces fall off. The side panels are barely staying on.

If I get biglug up and running, I'll save anything of interest that might be on the harddrive. Then, I'll replace MS-DOS with FreeDOS and maybe make it dual boot with Minix. Or not. I have two XT class PCs that I could run FreeDOS and Minix on as well.

Tuesday, June 5, 2007

woz

Model

  • Apple Macintosh SE/30
Introduced
  • 1989
CPU
  • Motorola MC68030 (68882 FPU), 16 MHz
RAM
  • 8 MB
Video
  • 9" Monochrome
Disk
  • 800 MB harddrive
Network
  • LocalTalk
Operating Systems
  • MacOS 7.5
I think the SE/30 is my all time favourite Mac, being quite a powerful computer for its time and very flexible. woz is currently running System 7.5 with a CD-ROM extension that allowed me to connect a CD-ROM via an external harddrive case (left open so I could put CDs in it) and install software from CD (before I had the AppleTalk network working with jobs). I've got a couple of real external SCSI CD-ROM drives now as well but I don't know yet if they'll work on an SE/30.

Some day, I just might try installing NetBSD on woz.

jobs

Model

  • Apple Macintosh Performa 5200CD
Introduced
  • 1995
CPU
  • PowerPC 603, 75 MHz
RAM
  • 48 MB
Video
  • 15" Colour
Disk
  • 4 GB harddrive
  • CD-ROM
Network
  • 10BASE-T
  • LocalTalk
Operating Systems
  • MacOS 7.6.1
Features
  • NuBus architecture
I replaced jobs' IDE harddrive with a non-standard 4 GB drive and used a hacked partition tool to create four 500MB MacOS volumes. I left the other half of the harddrive unpartitioned for use by Debian Linux, which I have yet to successfully install. Due to the NuBus architecture, I have to use a modified Linux kernel (from nubus-pmac.sourceforge.net) to boot the installation disk. I can get the installation process started, but it fails while loading packages and I can't switch to another console to see the error. I haven't given up yet, though.

Meanwhile, I've got a LaserWriter cable attached to jobs to create a point-to-point LocalTalk network to woz, my SE/30. I considered setting up a LocalTalk-to-Ethernet bridge but as it's currently set up I can download files from the Internet on jobs and transfer them via AppleTalk to woz.

Monday, June 4, 2007

libretto

Model

  • Toshiba Libretto 100CT
Introduced
  • 1998
CPU
  • Intel Mobile Pentium MMX, 200MHz (overclocked from 166MHz)
RAM
  • 64 MB
Video
  • NeoMagic MagicGraph 128XD (NM2160)
  • 800x480 , 7.2" TFT LCD display
Disk
  • 6 GB harddrive
Network
  • Wireless (CardBus NIC)
Operating Systems
  • Xubuntu Linux 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake)
Features
  • FIR infrared communication port
I've owned a couple of Palm compatibles and have used Blackberries for awhile; they're great but not terribly flexible. I remembered seeing a Toshiba Libretto about a decade ago and — thinking this might work better for me — I bought one from eBay. It came with a docking station but no CD-ROM drive. It didn't even have a floppy drive.

Installing Linux on it was no fun: I wanted to be able to hibernate the Libretto (have it go to sleep and wake up without having to go through the boot process) so I moved the harddrive to another PC, installed DOS on a small partition, booted it on the Libretto, and repartitioned the entire disk as a single partition. The Libretto lied to DOS about the size of the disk, leaving space on it for the hibernation partition.

Moving the harddrive back to the other PC, I used Linux to create a special partition to mark the hibernation space, deleted the DOS partition, and added a minimal partition to hold the contents of the Xubuntu install CD. After chanting and sacrificing a small goat, I got the harddrive to boot in the Libretto and run the Xubuntu install.

After the install, I moved the harddrive back into the other PC one last time, deleted the Linux install partition, and increased the size of the Xubuntu partition into the newly empty space (using the Linux fdisk command and the reiserfs tools).

And it worked. Xubuntu Linux is the same as Ubuntu but tweaked for low power systems. The main difference is the XFCE GUI it runs, which I find really suits the small Libretto screen. OpenOffice would be too much of a pig on this device, so instead I run AbiWord for a word processor, Gnumeric for a spreadsheet, and Glom for a database. The Gimp works fine, but I've substituted Opera for Firefox (and I am quite impressed with how nicely web pages render in Opera).

The mouse on libretto is like a TrackPoint except it's mounted to the right of the screen and you control it with your thumb. The buttons are on the opposite side of the lid from the TrackPoint (the top or outside of the lid) so when you click you essentially squeeze the lid. The TrackPoint isn't that sensitive, though, so I find I have to use a third finger to grip the case when I'm dragging things around. It took a little getting used to but works quite well.

The coolest thing is the hibernation function. When I close the lid libretto goes into hibernation mode, saving everything in memory to the hibernation partition on the harddrive. When I open the lid, it automatically turns on and loads the hibernation partition back into memory. In a few seconds the apps and docs I had open before are back and I'm ready to continue where I left off. Very convenient.

Saturday, June 2, 2007

laurence

Model

  • HP Vectra VL800 MT
Introduced
  • 2001
CPU
  • Intel Pentium 4, 1700MHz
RAM
  • 1280 MB
Video
  • Matrox G450
Disk
  • 10 GB harddrive
  • 189 GB harddrive
  • DVD-ROM
Network
  • 100BASE-TX
Operating Systems
  • Ubuntu Linux 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake)
Features

laurence is my secondary PC. It acts as a file server (which is why romeo doesn't have much disk space) and performs other centralized tasks like backups. I converted all my CDs to Ogg Vorbis files on laurence so I can listen to music from any PC in the house or from a laptop in the back yard (via my wireless network). With my pre-amplified turntable, I'll be converting all my vinyl albums to Ogg Vorbis next.

romeo

Model

  • HP Vectra VL800 MT
Introduced
  • 2001
CPU
  • Intel Pentium 4, 1700MHz
RAM
  • 1280 MB
Video
  • nVidia NV28 [GeForce4 Ti 4200 AGP 8x]
Disk
  • 19 GB harddrive
  • 37 GB harddrive
  • DVD-ROM
  • DVD-RAM
Network
  • Wireless
Operating Systems
  • Ubuntu Linux 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake)
  • Windows 2000 Professional
Features
  • Dual 21" HP p1230 displays in vertical configuration, attached to one dual-head video card
  • Wacom Graphire graphics tablet with mouse and pen, rotated to support vertical display configuration
  • HP LaserJet 4L black-and-white laser printer
romeo is my primary PC. Besides the usual functions, I do my photo editing and art work using the Graphire pen. With the Gimp — an image editing program — I can make the pen act like a paintbrush, eraser, airbrush, and various other tools (including a pen). I typically keep the tools in the top screen and the actual photo or graphic I'm working on in the bottom screen.

I also boot into Windows occasionally to run the few programs that just don't work in Linux. I've considered installing Wine so I can run them under Linux, but the last time I tried this it didn't go too well. I can live with the occasional reboot.

Running network cable for romeo would have been onerous so I opted for a 54Mbit/sec wireless network (theoretically about half the speed of my wired network).